Tiger Woods’ PopStroke breaks ground at UTC in Sarasota

Tiger Woods’ PopStroke breaks ground at UTC in Sarasota

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SARASOTA, Fla. — When Tiger Woods’ PopStroke opens in Sarasota early next year, it will be the crown jewel of a new commercial development that has been teased for years.
a group of people on a dirt road: Sarasota PopStroke
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© Provided by Golfweek Sarasota PopStroke
PopStroke, the golf and casual dining concept in which Woods is a partner, broke ground on its newest location in Sarasota, Florida, on Wednesday morning.

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It’s the first dining and entertainment project in development for the long-awaited East District. Benderson Development Co., the owner of the entire four million-square-foot University Town Center, has teased the part of the East District adjacent to the highway in various phases for at least five years.

Past plans included an iPic luxury movie theater chain, canals, hotel rooms and high-end residential, retail and office space.

But for now, Benderson is keeping quiet about the rest of its plans for the East District.

What we do know is that construction on Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium’s new building is happening. On Wednesday morning, construction crews were working on the future aquarium site near the roundabout that connects North Cattlemen and DeSoto roads.

a group of people on a beach: Sarasota PopStroke
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© Provided by Golfweek Sarasota PopStroke Construction has started on east side of the University Town Center Mall, including a new PopStroke golf entertainment facility. Photo by Mike Lang/Sarasota Herald-Tribune

We also know that PopStroke is the kickoff point for all future dining and entertainment offerings at the East District. And it’s a pretty big get.

PopStroke is slowly growing across Florida, as well as in other states where golf is popular. The company currently has locations in Port St. Lucie and Fort Myers.

Another location in Orlando is scheduled to open this year, and in 2022 there will be PopStroke locations opening in Tampa and Delray, Florida, as well as Houston, Texas, and in Scottsdale and Glendale, Arizona.

Direct delivery of craft cocktails

Greg Bartoli, the founder of PopStroke, summed up what his company is all about in remarks at the groundbreaking ceremony.

“Long gone are the days of windmills and clown mouths,” Bartoli said, referencing kitschy miniature golf concepts of the past. “Instead we have professionally designed putting courses by the greatest putter of all time.”

Instead of the clown mouths, he said, PopStroke has direct delivery of craft cocktails to each hole. It has a playground for children of all ages. And it has a restaurant and bar area with trendy food.

“Regardless of age, regardless of skill level, gender, background—it doesn’t matter—there’s something here for everybody,” he said. “When I look at our properties I get most excited and thrilled by the fact that I see a five-year-old having just as much fun as a 75-year-old grandfather would have.”

a group of people on a beach: Sarasota PopStroke
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© Provided by Golfweek Sarasota PopStroke Stevens Construction held a ribbon cutting ceremony for the new PopStroke at University Town Center in Sarasota, Florida. Photo by Mike Lang/Sarasota Herald-Tribune

The Sarasota location has two floorse. Guests will check in on the east side of the building. There’s an open central area with a bar and some tables. On the west side there’s a two-floor restaurant and bar. The upstairs area, which is more of a 21-plus environment, Bartoli said, can be rented out for private events.

“This one is going to be slightly larger,” he said. “We’ve expanded the restaurant footprint a little bit, and the golf course is a little bit wider and longer than the other golf courses are.”

Like other PopStrokes, the Sarasota course will still be 36 holes total—it’s just built on a larger piece of land. In total, the Sarasota location will sit on about three acres and be roughly 13,000-14,000 square feet.

PopStroke makes sense because it’s outdoors, there’s a food and drinks component and every member of the family can find something to do there. Its concept provides a sense of safety for guests that might be worried about COVID. That’s good news for a landlord in this day and age.

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St Andrews, GBR; Tiger Woods on the 2nd green during the first round for the 144th Open Championship at St. Andrews – Old Course

Tiger Woods’ PopStroke breaks ground at UTC in Sarasota

PopStroke, designed by Tiger Woods and his TGR team, breaks ground at Sarasota’s University Town Center.

Although Tiger Woods wasn’t in attendance, PopStroke held a groundbreaking ceremony Wednesday morning on the east side of the University Town Center Mall in Sarasota.

Woods forged a partnership in 2019 with his TGR design team, Tiger Woods Ventures and the PopStroke Entertainment Group. That partnership hopes to open its third PopStroke location (Ft. Myers and Port St. Lucie are the others) as early as January, 2022.

It’s also the first entertainment piece of Benderson Development’s mixed-use plan for the East District at UTC, which eventually will include office space, hotels, restaurants and multifamily housing.

PopStroke is a technology-infused golf and entertainment concept featuring professionally designed putting greens, along with food and beverage and other activities, such as cornhole and Foosball. A two-story restaurant is being constructed alongside the two 18-hole, synthetic-green, putting courses. The venue will be built on the shore of a small lake on the north end of Nathan Benderson Park and will have views of the incoming Mote Science and Education Aquarium and the finish tower.

“UTC is the epicenter of the area and PopStroke will draw every single age group,” said PopStroke founder Greg Bartoli. “This is the perfect environment. We truly are offering something that will be as much fun for a 5-year-old as it will be for a 75-year-old.”

Mark Stevens, the president of Stevens Construction, said in a perfect world, construction could be complete by Jan. 1, 2022, but he expects February or March to be more likely target dates for completion. Although the groundbreaking was held Wednesday, much of the below-the-ground work on the site has been done. A slab for the building will be poured in the next few weeks and then the project will go vertical.

Stevens said the PopStroke is another example of Woods’ impact on golf and his desire to bring golf to the masses.

“Our goal has always been to design courses that bring people together and are fun for golfers of all abilities and ages,” Woods says in a quote on PopStroke’s website. “Some of my happiest memories are spending time with my pops on the golf course having putting contests.”

PopStroke

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Overview

TGR Design continually strives to introduce the game of golf to a broader audience of players and find new ways for individuals and families to experience the game.  At the core of each project is the desire to create enjoyable, extraordinary golf experiences that bring people together. As an extension of TGR Design’s business and Tiger’s golf course design philosophy, PopStroke is a natural fit.

Founded in 2018, PopStroke is a technology-infused golf-entertainment concept featuring professionally designed putting courses and exceptional food and beverage.

TGR Design has designed and completed its first putting courses at the PopStroke facility in Fort Myers, Florida.  Locations in Houston, Texas; Scottsdale and Glendale, Arizona; and Sarasota, Orlando, Tampa, and Delray Beach, Florida are currently under development.  TGR Design and Tiger Woods will be responsible for designing the putting courses at all future PopStroke locations and hope to bring PopStroke closer to your backyard.

“Tiger Woods has had the most significant impact in growing the game of golf around the world and his investment and partnership in PopStroke will undoubtedly introduce the game to a new and wider audience of participants,” said PopStroke founder Greg Bartoli.

 

Putting Courses

 

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Tiger Woods

Tiger Woods
Tiger Woods in May 2019.jpg
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Woods at the White House in May 2019
Personal information
Full name Eldrick Tont Woods
Nickname Tiger
Born December 30, 1975 (age 45)
Cypress, California
Height 6 ft 1 in (185 cm)[1]
Weight 185 lb (84 kg)[1]
Nationality
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United States
Residence Jupiter Island, Florida
Spouse

(m. 2004; div. 2010)

Children 2
Career
College Stanford University
(two years)
Turned professional 1996
Current tour(s) PGA Tour (joined 1996)
Professional wins 109[2]
Highest ranking 1 (June 15, 1997)[3]
(683 weeks)
Number of wins by tour
PGA Tour 82 (Tied 1st all time)
European Tour 41 (3rd all time)[notes 1][4]
Japan Golf Tour 3
Asian Tour 2
PGA Tour of Australasia 3
Other 16
Best results in major championships
(wins: 15)
Masters Tournament Won: 1997, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2019
PGA Championship Won: 1999, 2000, 2006, 2007
U.S. Open Won: 2000, 2002, 2008
The Open Championship Won: 2000, 2005, 2006
Achievements and awards
World Golf Hall of Fame 2021 (member page)
PGA Tour
Rookie of the Year
1996
PGA Player of the Year 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2013
PGA Tour
Player of the Year
1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2013
PGA Tour
leading money winner
1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2013
Vardon Trophy 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2013
Byron Nelson Award 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
FedEx Cup Champion 2007, 2009
Presidential Medal of Freedom 2019
(For a full list of awards, see here)

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Eldrick Tont “Tiger” Woods (born December 30, 1975) is an American professional golfer. He is tied for first in PGA Tour wins, ranks second in men’s major championships, and holds numerous golf records.[5] Woods is widely regarded as one of the greatest golfers of all time and one of the most famous athletes in history. He was elected to the World Golf Hall of Fame.

Following an outstanding junior, college, and amateur golf career, Woods turned professional in 1996 at the age of 20. By the end of April 1997, he won three PGA Tour events in addition to his first major, the 1997 Masters, which he won by 12 strokes in a record-breaking performance. He reached number one in the world rankings for the first time in June 1997, less than a year after turning pro. Throughout the first decade of the 21st century, Woods was the dominant force in golf. He was the top-ranked golfer in the world from August 1999 to September 2004 (264 consecutive weeks) and again from June 2005 to October 2010 (281 consecutive weeks). During this time, he won 13 of golf’s major championships.

The next decade of Woods’ career was marked by comebacks from injuries. Woods competed in only one tournament between August 2015 and January 2018, and he dropped off the list of the world’s top 1,000 golfers. On his return to regular competition, Woods made steady progress to the top of the game, winning his first tournament in five years at the Tour Championship in September 2018 and his first major in 11 years at the 2019 Masters.

Woods has held numerous golf records. He has been the number one player in the world for the most consecutive weeks and for the greatest total number of weeks of any golfer in history. He has been awarded PGA Player of the Year a record 11 times and has won the Byron Nelson Award for lowest adjusted scoring average a record eight times. Woods has the record of leading the money list in ten different seasons. He has won 15 professional major golf championships (trailing only Jack Nicklaus, who leads with 18) and 82 PGA Tour events (tied for first all time with Sam Snead). Woods leads all active golfers in career major wins and career PGA Tour wins. Woods is the fifth (after Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Gary Player and Jack Nicklaus) player to achieve the career Grand Slam, and the youngest to do so. He is also the second golfer (after Nicklaus) to achieve a career Grand Slam three times.

Woods has won 18 World Golf Championships. He was also part of the American winning team for the 1999 Ryder Cup. In May 2019, Woods was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Donald Trump, the fourth golfer to receive the honor.

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BIOGRAPHY

As a nine year-old, Tiger made a bold commitment to his father, Earl: I’m going to be professionally excellent

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Tiger (Eldrick) Woods, born December 30, 1975, is a professional golfer and entrepreneur.

Since turning professional in 1996, Tiger has built an unprecedented competitive career. His achievements on the course–106 worldwide wins and 15 majors–have mirrored his success off the course as well.

Woods serves as Founder and CEO of TGR, a multibrand enterprise comprised of his various companies and philanthropic endeavors, including TGR Design, the golf course design company; The TGR Foundation, a charitable foundation; TGR Live, an events production company; and The Woods Jupiter, an upscale sports restaurant.

He has 82 PGA TOUR wins, tied with Sam Snead, holding the record for most wins in history. His majors victories include the five Masters Tournaments, four PGA Championships, three U.S. Open Championships, and three British Open Championships. With his second Masters victory in 2001, Tiger became the first golfer ever to hold all four professional major championships at the same time.

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In winning the 2000 British Open at St. Andrews, Woods became the youngest to complete the career Grand Slam of professional major championships and only the fifth ever to do so, following Ben Hogan, Gene Sarazen, Gary Player, and Jack Nicklaus. Tiger was also the youngest Masters champion ever, at the age of 21 years, three months and 14 days, and was the first major championship winner of African or Asian heritage. The 2000 U.S. Open and 2001 Masters victories came by record margins, 15 strokes and 12 strokes, respectively.

He is the career victories leader among active players on the PGA TOUR, and is the career money list leader.

Despite being unable to play the majority of 2016, Woods, the entrepreneur and philanthropist, made significant news. In February, the TGR Learning Lab in Anaheim celebrated its 10th anniversary, with satellite facilities now located in Washington, DC, Philadelphia and Stuart, Florida. Eight months later in October, the Tiger Woods Foundation commemorated its 20th anniversary with a gala event at the New York Public Library featuring Woods and Nike’s Phil Knight.

The Woods Jupiter celebrated its first anniversary—the restaurant opened in August, 2015—and TGR Design’s Bluejack National course located outside Houston, Texas was selected Best New Private Course by both Golf Digest and Golf Magazine/Sports Illustrated.

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He is the career victories leader among active players on the PGA TOUR, and is the career money list leader.

Tiger is the son of Earl Woods, a retired lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army, and his wife, Kultida, a native of Thailand.  He was nicknamed Tiger after a Vietnamese soldier and friend of his father, Vuong Dang Phong, to whom his father had also given that nickname.

He grew up in Cypress, California. He took an interest in golf at age 6 months, watching as his father hit golf balls into a net and imitating his swing.  He appeared on The Mike Douglas Show at age 2, putting with Bob Hope. He shot 48 for nine holes at age 3 and was featured in Golf Digest at age 5.

Tiger played in his first professional tournament in 1992, at age 16, the Los Angeles Open, and made the 36-hole cut and tied for 34th place in the 1994 Johnnie Walker Asian Classic in Thailand, He entered Stanford University in 1994 and in two years he won 10 collegiate events, concluding with the NCAA title.

Woods compiled one of the most impressive amateur records in golf history, winning six USGA national championships before turning professional on August 27, 1996. He concluded his amateur career by winning an unprecedented third consecutive U.S. Amateur title, finishing with a record 18 consecutive match-play victories.

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The week after winning his third U.S. Amateur title, Woods played his first tournament as a professional in the Greater Milwaukee Open. It was one of only seven events left in 1996 for him to finish among the top 125 money winners and earn a player’s card for the PGA TOUR. He won twice and placed among the top 30 money winners.

Woods won four PGA TOUR events in 1997, plus one overseas, and was the leading money winner.  He achieved No. 1 on the Official World Golf Ranking for the most rapid progression ever to that position. On June 15, 1997, in his 42nd week as a professional, Woods became the youngest-ever No. 1 golfer at age 21 years, 24 weeks.

Woods won eight times on the PGA TOUR in 1999 (11 worldwide), including the PGA Championship. He won four consecutive PGA TOUR events to end the year and started 2000 with two more victories for a total of six in succession.

In 2000, Woods won 11 events, including three professional majors in the same year, and also became the first player since 1936-37 to win the PGA Championship in consecutive years. Woods won five times, including the Masters, in 2001 and eight times worldwide. He won five times again on TOUR in 2002, and seven times worldwide, and was the TOUR’s leading money winner for the fourth consecutive year.

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Woods won five times, including the Masters, in 2001 and eight times worldwide.

He won a total of 20 times from 2003-06, lead the TOUR’s money list twice and captured four majors. Woods joined Nicklaus as the only player to win the Grand Slam twice. His emotional win the following year at the British Open at Royal Liverpool came two months after his father’s death. He won the 2006 PGA Championship by five strokes at Medinah CC, the same venue where he won the event in 1999.

He began 2007 with his seventh consecutive PGA TOUR victory and ended the year with a total of seven official wins, including a second-consecutive PGA Championship. In 2008, he won four of six PGA TOUR events, including his 14th major at the U.S. Open—his last event of the year before season-ending knee surgery—plus the Dubai Desert Classic, and finished second on the TOUR money list in just six starts. At his major win at Torrey Pines, Woods sank a 12-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole to force an eventual 19-hole playoff (tied at even-par 71 after 18 holes) the following day.  He later revealed that he had played the tournament with a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee and a double stress fracture in the same leg.

In 2009, he returned to the winner’s circle after 286 days and ended the year leading the PGA TOUR in victories (6) and money ($10,508,163). He also won his first tournament in Australia. He captured three tournaments in 2012 and five in 2013.

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Sports Illustrated selected Woods as the 1996 and 2000 Sportsman of the Year, the first to win the award more than once. L’Equipe (France) selected him as the 2000 World Champion of Champions. The Associated Press chose Woods as the Male Athlete of the Year for 1997, 1999 and 2000. He and Michael Jordan are the only athletes to win the award three times. He was chosen ESPY Male Athlete of the Year in 1997 (tied with Ken Griffey, Jr.), 1999, 2000 and 2001. The founding members of the World Sports Academy, in voting for the Laureus Sports Awards, also selected him as the 1999 and 2000 World Sportsman of the Year. In 2008 Businessweek made Woods No. 1 in The Power 100 for the most influential people in sports. In 2009 he was selected AP Athlete of the Decade. Woods received 56 of 142 votes cast by AP editors throughout the country. He was also inducted into the Stanford Athletics Hall of Fame.

Woods was selected as the 1997, 1999, 2000-2003, 2005-2007, 2009, 2013 Player of the Year by the PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award) and the PGA of America and by the Golf Writers Association of America in 1997, 1999, 2000-2003, 2005-2007, 2009. His adjusted scoring average averages in 2000 and 2007 of 67.79 strokes were the lowest ever and earned him the Byron Nelson Award on the PGA TOUR and the Vardon Trophy from the PGA of America. He also had an actual scoring average in 2000 of 68.17, breaking Nelson’s record of 68.33 in 1945.

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Career achievements

Woods has won 82 official PGA Tour events, including 15 majors. He is 14–1 when going into the final round of a major with at least a share of the lead. Multiple golf experts have heralded Woods as “the greatest closer in history”. He owns the lowest career scoring average and the most career earnings of any player in PGA Tour history.

Woods’s victory at the 2013 Players Championship also marked a win in his 300th PGA Tour start. He also won golf tournaments in his 100th (in 2000) and 200th (in 2006) tour starts.

Woods has spent the most consecutive and cumulative weeks atop the world rankings. He is one of five players (along with Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Gary Player, and Jack Nicklaus) to have won all four major championships in his career, known as the Career Grand Slam, and was the youngest to do so. Woods is the only player to have consecutively won all four major championships open to professionals, accomplishing the feat in the 2000–2001 seasons.

Major championships

Wins (15)

Year Championship 54 holes Winning score Margin Runner(s)-up
1997 Masters Tournament 9 shot lead −18 (70-66-65-69=270) 12 strokes
United States
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Tom Kite
1999 PGA Championship Tied for lead −11 (70-67-68-72=277) 1 stroke
Spain
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Sergio García
2000 U.S. Open 10 shot lead −12 (65-69-71-67=272) 15 strokes
South Africa
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Ernie Els,
Spain
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Miguel Ángel Jiménez
2000 The Open Championship 6 shot lead −19 (67-66-67-69=269) 8 strokes
Denmark
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Thomas Bjørn,
South Africa
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Ernie Els
2000 PGA Championship (2) 1 shot lead −18 (66-67-70-67=270) Playoff1
United States
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Bob May
2001 Masters Tournament (2) 1 shot lead −16 (70-66-68-68=272) 2 strokes
United States
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David Duval
2002 Masters Tournament (3) Tied for lead −12 (70-69-66-71=276) 3 strokes
South Africa
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Retief Goosen
2002 U.S. Open (2) 4 shot lead −3 (67-68-70-72=277) 3 strokes
United States
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Phil Mickelson
2005 Masters Tournament (4) 3 shot lead −12 (74-66-65-71=276) Playoff2
United States
  • Facebook
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Chris DiMarco
2005 The Open Championship (2) 2 shot lead −14 (66-67-71-70=274) 5 strokes
Scotland
  • Facebook
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  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
Colin Montgomerie
2006 The Open Championship (3) 1 shot lead −18 (67-65-71-67=270) 2 strokes
United States
  • Facebook
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Chris DiMarco
2006 PGA Championship (3) Tied for lead −18 (69-68-65-68=270) 5 strokes
United States
  • Facebook
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  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
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Shaun Micheel
2007 PGA Championship (4) 3 shot lead −8 (71-63-69-69=272) 2 strokes
United States
  • Facebook
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  • LinkedIn
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Woody Austin
2008 U.S. Open (3) 1 shot lead −1 (72-68-70-73=283) Playoff3
United States
  • Facebook
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  • Google+
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Rocco Mediate
2019 Masters Tournament (5) 2 shot deficit −13 (70-68-67-70=275) 1 stroke
United States
  • Facebook
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Dustin Johnson,
United States
  • Facebook
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