CARMELO ANTHONY IS TAKING CARE OF BUSINESS, 6TH MAN OF THE YEAR TROPHY SHOULD BE DELIVERED, ASAP

CARMELO ANTHONY IS TAKING CARE OF BUSINESS, 6TH MAN OF THE YEAR TROPHY SHOULD BE DELIVERED, ASAP

Carmelo Anthony is quickly firming up as a genuine 2021-22 Sixth Man of the Year candidate.

This may have been unthinkable a few years ago, but it has now become reality as the veteran star continues to thrive after accepting his role-playing future.

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Anthony’s story is well told. Plucked out of NBA obscurity by the injury-riddled Portland Trail Blazers a couple of seasons ago, Anthony was desperate to return to an NBA floor, even if it meant he had to part ways with the feature role he carried throughout his career.

Two season with the Blazers led Anthony to a Lakers roster over flowing with some of the marquee names the game has had to offer over the last decade. Rather than attempting to get into a battle of where or how he gets his touches, Melo has simply slotted into the second unit, taking what comes his way in an offence that has often sputtered elsewhere.

The veteran exploded for 24 points off the bench in the win over the Cavaliers, knocking down six triple from his eight attempts.

“He’s one of the best in the league. He’s a professional scorer throughout his career,” head coach Frank Vogel said.

“To his credit, he’s really made a transition to be an elite catch-and-shoot guy that has good size that can shoot with a hand in his face. 6-for-8 from three, a lot of huge buckets, a big part of the win.”

As is the nature of playing alongside players like LeBron, Russ and AD, Melo is finding his shot attempts in open space, which bodes well for his continued success in this offence.

Coming into the game against Cleveland, Anthony was attempting 5.0 catch-and-shoot threes a game, knocking down a very respectable 40 percent. Anthony shot 40.2 percent on those attempts in 2019-20 and 39.8 percent last season.

Perhaps more importantly, NBA.com tracking data shows that 5.0 of his 6.0 3-point attempts per game are classified as wide or wide open.

“Just finding my spot, finding my position on the court,” Anthony said postgame. “LeBron does a great job of reading the court, seeing where every is at and knowing where guys are on the court. Today he did a great job of finding me.”

Averaging 15.7 points per game through six, Anthony’s scoring average is the highest it’s been since his last season with the Oklahoma City Thunder in 2017-18.

The outburst against the Cavs is the second time Anthony has knocked down six triples in a game this season, with the first instance coming in a 28-point night against Memphis. The Lakers won that game against the Grizzlies and similar to tonight’s game against Cleveland they needed every single one of his ‘three to the dome’ celebrations.

Melo recently passed Moses Malone on the all-time scoring list to sit ninth. It’s been a muddled few years for Anthony but there are only eight players in the history of the league that have scored more points with Shaquille O’Neal likely to also be leapfrogged this season at current pace.

Anthony is a weapon off the bench in this offence, and should only become more so as the Lakers build chemistry with the rest of the roster.

More than anything, we should appreciate watching Anthony extend his career in a role he has never had to fulfill throughout his basketball life.

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Los Angeles Lakers vs. Grizzlies: Vintage Carmelo Anthony is back

The Los Angeles Lakers have found themselves in the middle of an eight-game losing streak going back into the preseason. Coming off two losses that featured an implosion against the Phoenix Suns with a scuffle on the bench between Anthony Davis and Dwight Howard along with Rajon Rondo’s incident with a fan, the Lakers faced the Memphis Grizzlies on Sunday night.

After falling down early 17-7 creating a vibe of “Uh oh”, the Lakers went crazy to end the first quarter on a 22-7 run led by Anthony Davis down low and the sharpshooting of Carmelo Anthony from the outside.

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But after going into halftime up six points, Ja’ Morant (More on this dude later!) exploded in the third quarter to make it a very close final quarter.

Then both teams put up a great battle but in the end, the Los Angeles Lakers won the game 121-118. Games like these make post games fun and this is easily the most complete team performance by the Lakers this season.

The good from the Los Angeles Lakers’ win:

Russell Westbrook got DeAndre Jordan untracked early!

Let’s be clear here, as bad as Russell Westbrook has struggled in his short time in Los Angeles, DeAndre Jordan has been worse. A whole lot worse. But in this game, Westbrook seemingly found Jordan time and time again early in the game.

 

Jordan scored more baskets in the first seven minutes (3) than he had in the first two games combined (2). But contributing to DeAndre’s scoring got him engaged on both ends. D.J. rebounded the ball well and blocked shots. He kept things manageable before his teammates took over and went on that huge run spanning the first and second quarters.

The Lakers can live with 8 points and 8 rebounds from Jordan. The Lake Show Life staff can too.

Anthony Davis’ start!

Sometimes readers of Lake Show Life ask me if the team reads these things. After AD’s performance, the staff wondered if he read the last post-game report…

Give the ball to AD on the left wing and let him figure out if he will go to the paint, go to his left for a fadeaway or shoot a fadeaway jumper from that spot.

Well, Anthony Davis got to the paint and did damage at the rim scoring 13 points in the first half. He didn’t bail the Grizzlies out by shooting fall-away jumpers, he used his size to overpower their frontline to score baskets.

His aggressiveness took Jaren Jackson Jr. totally out of the game and AD had a huge block late in the game on Jackson Jr.’s 3 point shot that kept Memphis at bay.

Then after struggling with free throws all season long, AD hit two huge free throws in crunch time. He finished with 22 points, 8 rebounds and 4 blocks.

Carmelo Anthony made history! 

Yes, this writer is biased on Carmelo Anthony and here’s why. Anthony passed Moses Malone for ninth place on the all-time scoring list.

But it was much more than that for Melo. In the last quarter, he was bombing Memphis from beyond the arc and finished with 28 points. The Lakers needed every last point he gave out.

He outscored the Memphis bench by himself.

This game in general.

This will be replayed on NBATV tomorrow guaranteed. This was the game of the night.

The bad from the Los Angeles Lakers’ win:

Offensive rebounding!

Memphis for the most part besides Ja Morant was terrible throughout the game. What kept it close was the dominant performance on the offensive boards. The Grizz, led by Steven Adams, had eight offensive rebounds by himself to the Lakers’ nine. The extra possessions hurt the Lakers a lot.

The story from the Los Angeles Lakers’ win:

Russell Westbrook needs to archive video of this game because this is the blueprint of how he needs to play for the Los Angeles Lakers.

The Lakers have already reneged on their promise of getting LeBron James to play off the ball long-term. Now Russ will have to adjust to thrive in this offense. In the first half of this game, he proved that he can carve his own niche’. After dishing out nine assists to his teammates, he exploded for nine straight points late in the second quarter.

He finished with 13 points, 13 assists with a huge steal to seal the game for the Lakers.

The Los Angeles Lakers shoots lights out from behind the arc!

LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony and Malik Monk hit huge shots throughout the game from the 3 point line.  Shooting 16-30 from distance can win you a lot of games.

Ja Morant…

Look the Lakers won this game, but they didn’t beat the Memphis Grizzlies…they beat Ja Morant. This dude put on a show in this game scoring in every conceivable way a player can on a basketball court.

Morant finished with an absurd stat line of 40 points, 10 assists and 3 rebounds. Sure he missed that free throw to send it to overtime, but this dude is a legitimate superstar!

But in the end, the Lakers had six players in double figures and that canceled his great performance out.

Carmelo Anthony

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Carmelo Anthony
TBT Basketball (36324710176) (cropped).jpg
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Anthony in 2017
No. 7 – Los Angeles Lakers
Position Small forward / Power forward
League NBA
Personal information
Born May 29, 1984 (age 37)
Brooklyn, New York
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)
Listed weight 238 lb (108 kg)
Career information
High school
College Syracuse (2002–2003)
NBA draft 2003 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3rd overall
Selected by the Denver Nuggets
Playing career 2003–present
Career history
20032011 Denver Nuggets
20112017 New York Knicks
2017–2018 Oklahoma City Thunder
2018–2019 Houston Rockets
20192021 Portland Trail Blazers
2021–present Los Angeles Lakers
Career highlights and awards
Stats 
Edit this at Wikidata
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at NBA.com
Stats 
Edit this at Wikidata
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at Basketball-Reference.com
Medals
Men’s basketball
Representing
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United States
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place
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2008 Beijing Team
Gold medal – first place
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2012 London Team
Gold medal – first place
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2016 Rio de Janeiro Team
Bronze medal – third place
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2004 Athens Team
World Championship
Bronze medal – third place
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2006 Japan
Americas Championship
Gold medal – first place
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2007 Las Vegas

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Carmelo Kyam Anthony (born May 29, 1984) is an American professional basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He has been named an NBA All-Star ten times and an All-NBA Team member six times. He played college basketball for the Syracuse Orange, winning a national championship as a freshman in 2003 while being named the NCAA Tournament’s Most Outstanding Player. During the NBA’s 75th anniversary, he was named one of the 75 Greatest Players in NBA History.

After one season at Syracuse, Anthony entered the 2003 NBA draft and was selected with the third overall pick by the Denver Nuggets. While playing for Denver, he led the Nuggets to the playoffs every year from 2004 to 2010; the team won two division titles in that span. In 2009, Anthony led the Nuggets to their first Conference Finals appearance since 1985. In 2011, he was traded from Denver to the New York Knicks days before the NBA trade deadline. In a January 24, 2014, game against the Charlotte Bobcats, Anthony scored a career-high 62 points, setting a Knicks’ single-game scoring record and a Madison Square Garden single-game scoring record. Anthony was traded to the Oklahoma City Thunder, where he played one season before a short stint with the Houston Rockets. He spent two seasons with the Portland Trail Blazers prior to joining the Lakers.

Anthony has played in the Olympics for the US national team a record four times, winning a bronze medal with the 2004 squad and gold medals on the 2008, 2012, and 2016 Olympic teams. As of April 2016, he was the US Olympic team’s all-time leader in points, rebounds, and games played.

Early life and high school career

Anthony was born in the Red Hook housing projects in Brooklyn, New York City. His father, Carmelo Iriarte, was born in Manhattan to Puerto Rican parents. Iriarte was of African, Spanish, and indigenous ancestry; some of his roots also traced to Venezuela. His mother, Mary Anthony, is African-American. Iriarte died of cancer when Anthony was two years old. When Anthony turned eight, his family moved to Baltimore.

Anthony commuted to Towson Catholic High School for his first three years of high school. During the summer of 1999, Anthony grew five inches into the frame of a 6–5 swingman. He suddenly became one of the area’s top players and made a name for himself in the area, being named The Baltimore Suns metro player of the year in 2001, as well as Baltimore Catholic League player of the year. During his sophomore year, he averaged 14 points, five rebounds, four assists and two steals. Towson Catholic surged to a record of 26–3 and finished third in the state tournament. Anthony enjoyed a successful high school basketball career as a junior, almost doubling his numbers in scoring and rebounds, averaging 23 points and 10.3 rebounds. Despite his successful year, Anthony was distracted by all of the attention and was suspended on several occasions for skipping classes. He barely registered a blip on the radars of pro scouts with his skinny frame and lack of strength; many scouts felt that he was not ready for the physical demands of the NBA. In the end, Towson Catholic fell short of the state title, although he was named Baltimore’s County Player of the Year, All-Metropolitan Player of the Year and Baltimore Catholic League Player of the Year.

After his junior year, Division I coaches were lined up to recruit Anthony to a school on the East Coast, which included North Carolina and Syracuse. In contrast to contemporary prep-to-pro players like Kevin Garnett, Jermaine O’Neal, Kobe Bryant, Tracy McGrady or Amar’e Stoudemire, he decided to declare early and announce that he would attend Syracuse University before his senior year. As Anthony’s grades dropped under a C average and his scores on the ACT were below acceptable standards, he knew that he needed to improve in the classroom to qualify academically for Syracuse. For his senior year, his mother considered transferring him to a different school. Anthony first thought of Virginia’s Hargrave Military Academy but after talking to Steve Smith, the head coach at basketball powerhouse Oak Hill Academy, he eventually transferred to Oak Hill Academy in Virginia—winner of the USA Today 2000–01 high school championship—for his senior campaign. During the summer of 2001, Anthony led an AAU Baltimore Select team to the Final Four of the Adidas Big Time Tournament in Las Vegas, Nevada. Anthony attracted attention from the NBA by averaging 25.2 points a game in the tournament, which was also attended by Amar’e Stoudemire (who was already being touted as a future lottery pick). Anthony played at the USA Basketball Youth Development Festival where he helped the East Team win the silver medal. He tied LeBron James for the tournament scoring lead at 24 points per game and shot 66 percent from the field. It was there that Anthony and James struck up a friendship.

Oak Hill Academy entered the 2001–02 campaign boasting a 42-game winning streak. The team’s first tournament win came in The Les Schwab Invitational against Mater Dei High School from Santa Ana, California, with Anthony winning the tournament MVP. Oak Hill won two more big-time tournaments, including the Nike Academy National Invitational where they knocked off then-No. 1 Westchester High School 77–61 in the final, and an anticipated game against St. Vincent – St. Mary High School of Akron, Ohio, where he was matched up with high school phenom LeBron James. James scored 36 points, while Anthony scored 34 points and grabbed 11 rebounds to lead Oak Hill to a 72–66 win. The team ended the season ranked third in the country at 32–1, with their only loss coming in a rematch against Mater Dei, which ended their unbeaten streak at 67. He averaged 21.7 points, 8.1 rebounds and 4.0 assists during his senior year at Oak Hill and named a USA Today All-USA First Team and a Parade First-Team All-American. He was selected to play in the Jordan Brand Classic, scoring a game-high 27 points, and the 2002 McDonald’s All-American Game, where he played on the same team with two future New York Knicks teammates, Raymond Felton and Amar’e Stoudemire. In that game, he scored 19 points and won the Sprite Slam Jam dunk contest. His performances at the high school All-Star games, helped lift his reputation with HoopScoop ranking him as the nation’s No. 1 high school senior in the class of 2002, ranked second by College Basketball News and third by All-Star Sports. Due to his struggles with the ACT, his family and friends wondered whether Anthony would forget about his college plans to attend Syracuse and move on to the NBA. He had yet to produce the minimum score of 18; however, in late April Anthony got a 19 and decided to stick with college and prepared for his freshman year at Syracuse. In April 2009, he was named to the ESPN RISE’s all-decade team and was honored as one of the 35 Greatest McDonald’s All-Americans in January 2012.

College career

Anthony played one season at Syracuse University, during the 2002–03 season, where he averaged 22.2 points (16th in the NCAA, fourth in the Big East) and 10.0 rebounds (19th in the NCAA, third in the Big East, first among NCAA Division I freshmen). He helped guide the Orangemen to their first ever NCAA tournament title in 2003. He led the team in scoring, rebounding, minutes played (36.4 minutes per game), field goals made and free throws made and attempted. Anthony’s 33-point outburst against the University of Texas in the Final Four set an NCAA tournament record for most points by a freshman. In the championship game against the University of Kansas, Anthony had 20 points and 10 rebounds. For his efforts during the NCAA tournament, Anthony earned the tournament’s Most Outstanding Player Award. Afterwards, Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim described Anthony as “[…] by far, the best player in college basketball. It wasn’t even close. Nobody was even close to him last year in college basketball. That’s the bottom line”.

Anthony said that he originally planned to stay at Syracuse for two to three seasons, but having already accomplished everything he set out to do, he chose to abandon his collegiate career (with Boeheim’s blessing) and declared himself eligible for the 2003 NBA draft. Some of Anthony’s highlights in his time with Syracuse include being named Second-Team All-American by the Associated Press as a freshman, leading his team to a 30–5 record, capturing the school’s first ever NCAA title and being the consensus pick for NCAA Freshman of the Year. He was also named to the All-Big East First Team and was the consensus selection for the Big East Conference Freshman of the Year as so as unanimous selection for Big East All Rookie Team.

 

 

 

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