Tiger ignites the Players’ crowd and charges 60 spots up the leaderboard with a personal best round at TPC Sawgrass.

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For much of the afternoon, it looked like Tiger would miss the cut by a shot at TPC Sawgrass. Then came that late adjustment just before 7 p.m. ET and the top 70 (and ties) now included all those at 1-under. Tiger got another shot at 36 more holes.

It was a gift not just to him but for those watching too, as he torched TPC Sawgrass to the ground early on Saturday morning to put some life into this championship before lunchtime. Woods poured in five birdies in his first seven holes of the third round, making a dramatic leap up the board. He started the day in a tie for 68th and walked off the seventh hole, just 90 minutes into his round, in a tie for 17th.

It ended with Tiger walking off the 18th hole inside the top 10 after a third-round 65. It’s his lowest score ever on this TPC Sawgrass course in 66 rounds. The 65 is an impressive number, but you get the sense that Tiger will feel like it could have been better given the way his putter was rolling. After the round, he said “65 was as high as I could have shot today.

There aren’t many things more exciting in golf than when Tiger Woods gets things going. That idea was proven once again Saturday, as Woods opened in a scorching 6-under 30 in Round 3 at the Players Championship on his way to an electrifying 7-under 65.

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That round, his lowest ever at the Players Championship, rocketed Woods from a tie for 68th to a tie for eighth at 8 under and had the golf world buzzing after the 42-year-old had struggled in his last several rounds to make much hay.

Simply, it was a Saturday to remember. And it was a reminder the excitement that a scorching Tiger can bring to the golf world.

The show did not delay for a second on Saturday, as Woods buried a 15-footer for birdie at the par-4 first. He followed by chipping to 5 feet at the par-5 second and holing the putt to start birdie-birdie.

A 10-footer at the par-4 fourth meant another birdie, and he was really cooking when he coaxed in a 17-footer for his fourth birdie of the day at the par-4 fifth. When Woods drained a 10-footer for birdie at the par-4 seventh, he was 5 under for the round and 6 under overall.

With the golf world becoming frenzied, Woods launched an iron just over the green at the par-5 ninth, lagged his ensuing putt from the fringe to inches and tapped in for birdie and an opening 6-under 30. He had gone from a tie for 68th to a tie for 11th at 7 under in just nine holes.

And it was about to heat up further.

Two brilliant shots at the par-5 11th left him roughly 40 feet for eagle. He two-putted from there to move 7 under for the round and into the top 10 at 8 under overall. A terrific up and down for another birdie at the par-4 12th put Woods an astonishing 8 under through 12 on the day.

After he rolled in the 8-footer there, Woods was suddenly tied for fifth and just one shot back of second place.

He then put his tee shot 15 feet from the flag at the par-3 13th. With another potential birdie staring him in the face and everybody taking notice of his incredible day, Woods proceeded to lose a bit of his mojo.

The putt would miss to the right, leading to par. Woods then missed his drive right at the par-4 14th and had to chop out short of the green after being left with a bad lie in the rough. He pitched to about 25 feet and missed the putt for par. Two holes later, he had 8 feet for birdie at the simple par-5 16th but lipped out the opportunity.

He would close with two more pars to fire that 65.

While his finish to the round lacked some pizzazz, it was a monumental day for Woods. It also arises a day after he came within a break or two of missing the cut.

It’s always up and down in the Woods world nowadays, but there’s little negative that can be taken from this round.

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Woods found 11 of 14 fairways and 15 of 18 greens on the round and took 27 putts. There were no weaknesses in his game Saturday. His driver got a little loose late, but otherwise his play off the tee was pristine.

The iron play that maligned his Masters was nonexistent, as almost all of his approaches were on target and he left himself with a plethora of makeable birdie looks. And the putter that abandoned him at Quail Hollow brought almost the opposite performance Saturday, as Woods drained almost every putt he saw from the 5-20 foot range.

The 65 not only marks Woods’ best round at this event but also his lowest score in a PGA Tour round since the second day of the 2015 Wyndham Championship.

The afternoon wave remains on Saturday with a gettable course facing that crew (Jordan Spieth matched Woods’ 65 this morning to also reach 8 under). So Woods may be significantly lower than tied for eighth by day’s end.

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And he’s still seven shots back with the leader Webb Simpson yet to tee off. As Simpson holds a five-shot lead, Woods could creep closer by day’s end if Simpson falters. On the other hand, Simpson continuing to flourish would mean Woods remains out of contention going into Sunday.

Whatever happens, Woods had been missing that low-round magic. Until today.

Another key milestone in Woods’ comeback is complete.

Eldrick Tont Woods (born December 30, 1975) better known as Tiger Woods, is an American professional golfer who is among the most successful golfers of all time. He has been one of the highest-paid athletes in the world for several years.

Following an outstanding junior, college, and amateur career, Woods was 20 years old when he turned professional at the end of summer in 1996. By the end of April 1997, he had won three PGA Tour events in addition to his first major, the 1997 Masters. Woods won this tournament by 12 strokes in a record-breaking performance and earned $486,000. He first reached the number one position in the world rankings in June 1997, less than a year after turning pro. Throughout the 2000s, Woods was the dominant force in golf—he won the 2000 U.S. Open by a record 15-shot margin. He was the top-ranked golfer in the world from August 1999 to September 2004 (264 weeks) and again from June 2005 to October 2010 (281 weeks).

He has ranked number one for a total of 683 weeks, more than any other player in history. He ended a career-high winless streak of 107 weeks when he triumphed in the Chevron World Challenge in December 2011. After winning the Arnold Palmer Invitational on March 25, 2013, he ascended to the No.1 ranking once again, holding the top spot until May 2014.

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Woods has broken numerous golf records. He has been World Number One for the most consecutive weeks and for the greatest total number of weeks of any golfer. He has been awarded PGA Player of the Year a record eleven times, the Byron Nelson Award for lowest adjusted scoring average a record eight times, and has the record of leading the money list in ten different seasons. He has won 14 professional major golf championships, where he trails only Jack Nicklaus who leads with 18, and 79 PGA Tour events, second all-time behind Sam Snead(82).[16] Woods leads all active golfers in career major wins and career PGA Tour wins. He is the youngest player to achieve the career Grand Slam, and the youngest and fastest to win 50 tournaments on tour. Additionally, Woods is only the second golfer (after Nicklaus) to have achieved a career Grand Slam three times. Woods has won 18 World Golf Championships, and won at least one of those events in each of the first 11 years after they began in 1999. Woods and Rory McIlroy are the only golfers to win both The Silver Medal and The Gold Medal at The Open Championship.