Warren Moon acknowledges the rest of the Class of 2006 during his enshrinement into the Pro Football Hall of Fame Saturday, Aug. 5, 2006, in Canton, Ohio. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan) ORG XMIT: OHMD116
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Mr. Harold Warren Moon (born November 18, 1956) is an American former professional gridiron footballquarterback who played for the Edmonton Eskimos of the Canadian Football League (CFL), and the Houston Oilers, Minnesota Vikings, Seattle Seahawks, and Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League (NFL). He is currently the color commentator for the Seahawks radio network, working alongside Steve Raible. He was the first African-American quarterback inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

When MR. H.W. Moon retired, he held several all-time professional gridiron football passing records. He held the record for most pass attempts, pass completions, passing yards, and touchdowns. Moon’s passing yards record of 70,553, His mark of 435 total touchdown passes, Moon held the NFL career completion record, Moon was the quarterback with the most pass attempts in professional football history,  MR. H.W. MOON OWNED ALL NFL RECORDS, AND THEY WERE IN PLACE AT HIS RETIREMENT.

In 2010, Moon started Sports 1 Marketing with his business partner David Meltzer. Founded by Hall of Fame Quarterback Warren Moon and veteran sports & technology executive David Meltzer, Sports 1 Marketing is a global sports and entertainment marketing agency that leverages over $20 billion in relationship capital and over 38 years of business experience, bringing athletes, celebrities and businesses together to make a lot of money, help a lot of people, and have a lot of fun. A prerequisite for projects we work on is that there is a benefit to a philanthropic organization or cause.  We proudly work with dozens of charities, notably, The Crescent Moon Foundation, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and The Unstoppable Foundation. Our focus is to abundantly create value for our partners and clients. Our ability to monetize relationship capital and experiential knowledge across multiple industries enables us to do so. We are fortunate to have the opportunity to align our partners with prestigious sports and entertainment projects such as: Super Bowl, The Master’s, Breeders Cup, Sundance, ESPYs, Internships.com, and many more.

Moon was born in Los Angeles, as the middle child amongst six sisters. His father, Harold, was a laborer and died of liver disease when Moon was seven years old. His mother, Pat, was a nurse, and Warren learned to cook, sew, iron and housekeep to help take care of the family. He decided early on that he could play only one sport in high school because he had to work the rest of the year to help the family. He chose not only to play football but to be a quarterback since he found that he could throw a football longer, harder, and straighter than anyone he knew.

He enrolled at Alexander Hamilton High School, using the address of one of his mother’s friends to gain the advantages of a better academic and athletic reputation than his neighborhood high school could offer. He had little playing time until his junior year, when he took over as varsity starting quarterback. In his senior season, they reached the city playoffs, and Moon was named to the all-city team.

He was recruited by a number of colleges, but some wanted to convert Moon to another position as was the norm for many major colleges recruiting black high school quarterbacks. Moon decided to attend West Los Angeles College in 1974–75 where he was a record-setting quarterback. After Moon showed his ability at West L.A., only a handful of four-year colleges showed interest in signing him. Offensive Coordinator Dick Scesniak of the University of Washington, however, was eager to sign the rifle-armed Moon. Moon was adamant that he play quarterback.  The Huskies went 11–11 in Moon’s first two seasons as a starter, but during his senior year, he led the Don James-coached Huskies to a 27–20 win over the favored Michigan Wolverines in the 1978 Rose Bowl and was named the game’s Most Valuable Player on the strength of two short touchdown runs and a third-quarter 28-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver Robert “Spider” Gaines.

Despite his collegiate success, Warren Moon went undrafted in the National Football League. With no takers in the NFL, he turned to the Canadian Football League. Moon signed with the Edmonton Eskimos, where he and Tom Wilkinson shared signal-calling duties and helped lead the Eskimos to a record five consecutive Grey Cup victories in 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, and 1982. Moon won the offensive Grey Cup Most Valuable Player award in the 1980 and 1982 games. Moon became the first professional quarterback to pass for 5,000 yards in a season by reaching exactly 5,000 yards in 1982. In his final CFL season of 1983, Moon threw for a league record 5,648 yards, and won the CFL’s Most Outstanding Player Award. Throughout his CFL career, Moon amassed 1,369 completions on 2,382 attempts (57.4 completion percentage) for 21,228 yards and 144 touchdown passes. He also led his team to victory in 9 of 10 postseason games. He was inducted into theCanadian Football Hall of Fame in 2001 and the Edmonton Eskimos Wall of Honour. In 2006, he was ranked fifth on a list of the greatest 50 CFL players presented by Canadian sports network TSN.

Before the start of the 1989 season, Moon was given a five-year, $10-million contract extension, which made him the highest-paid player in the National Football League at that time. In 1990, Moon led the league with 4,689 passing yards. He also led the league in attempts (584), completions (362), and touchdowns (33), and tied Dan Marino‘s record with nine 300-yard games in a season. That included throwing for 527 yards against Kansas City on December 16, 1990, the second-most passing yards ever in a single game. The following year, he again led the league in passing yards, with 4,690. At the same time, he joined Marino and Dan Fouts as the only quarterbacks to post back-to-back 4,000-yard seasons. Moon also established new NFL records that season with 655 attempts and 404 completions.

As a Houston Oiler, Moon set a franchise record for wins with 70. He also left the Oilers as the franchise leader in passing touchdowns, passing yards, pass attempts, and pass completions, all of which still stand today.

He was traded to the Minnesota Vikings after the season, where he passed for over 4,200 yards in each of his first two seasons, but missed half of the 1996 season with a broken collarbone.  Moon then signed with the Seattle Seahawks as a free agent. After a two-year stint in the Pacific northwest, Moon signed as a free agent with the Kansas City Chiefs in 1999.  He played two years with the Chiefs before announcing his retirement in January 2001.

Combining his NFL and CFL stats, Moon’s numbers are nearly unmatched in professional football annals: 5,357 completions in 9,205 attempts for 70,553 yards and 435 touchdowns. Even if his Canadian League statistics are discounted, Warren Moon’s career is still exceptional: 3,988 completions for 49,325 yards, 291 touchdown passes, 1,736 yards rushing, and 22 rushing touchdowns. Warren Moon also held individual NFL lifetime records for most fumbles recovered (56) and most fumbles made (162). Moon was in the top five all-time when he retired for passing yards, passing touchdowns, pass attempts, and pass completions.

During his NFL career, Warren Moon was named to 9 Pro Bowl games (1988–1995, 1997). He currently works as a broadcaster for the Seattle Seahawks on both TV and radio. On the radio, he is a play-by-play announcer with former Seattle Seahawks receiver Steve Raible, who is the lead play-by-play announcer and evening anchor/sports anchor for KIRO-TV in Seattle. He was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006, becoming both the first Canadian Football Hall of Famer, first undrafted quarterback, and first African-American quarterback to be so honored; he was elected in his first year of eligibility. The Tennessee Titans retired his number at halftime on October 1 vs the Dallas Cowboys. Moon won his first Super Bowl ring as a broadcaster for the Seattle Seahawks.

In March 2011, Moon stepped back in the limelight while working as a “mentor” to Cam Newton, who was picked first overall in the 2011 NFL draft by the Carolina Panthers. Moon publicly stated that Newton was being unfairly criticized for character flaws, lack of experience, and low football IQ, and that the only reason that Newton was being targeted by football analysts and sports writers was because he is African-American.

 
 
 
 

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